PRO Resource: Declaration of the Rights of Man (Beta)

Primary Source: Declaration of the Rights of Man

Learning Objective:

  • Elementary: Students will be able to analyze the sections of the Declarations of the Rights of Man to determine the influence on contemporary daily life.
  • Secondary: Students will be able to analyze the sections of the Declaration of the Rights of Man to compare to the US Declaration of Independence.

Newsela PRO Features:

  • Instructions
  • Recommended Annotations
  • Write

Grade Levels:

  • Activity can be modified to all grade levels- best in secondary world history
  • Content Connections - World History / Early US History

Activity:

  • Elementary: While reading students will highlight evidence in GREEN that surprises them. Then they will Annotate to explain a connection to their everyday lives. Students will then be separated into small groups based on teacher choice (groups of 2-4) for different sections of the document. Groups will analyze their section and create a poster for a gallery walk based on the question: How does this section connect to our daily lives?  They can create a visual, poem, list, or combination to support their connections. Students will also summarize to put in their own words. Then students will view other groups work in Gallery Walk to make deeper connections to the document as a whole.
  • Secondary: While reading students will highlight evidence in GREEN that connects to the Declaration of Independence. Then Annotate to explain their reasoning. After reading, teacher will separate students in groups (2-4) to focus on one section and create a document or poster that goes into more detail about the connection. Students may use visuals or other resources to emphasize the connection. Students will participate in Gallery Walk to view other student work to make deeper connections to the document as a whole.

A Gallery Walk around the classroom sparks conversation and critical thinking. It can be used before and / or after reading (or writing.)

Small groups of 2-5 students work together to share ideas and respond to questions, documents, images, quotes, or scenarios. The teacher creates a set of questions or prompts about the current topic, writing each one on chart paper placed at stations around the room. Student groups begin at different stations. Assign a Recorder per station to write for the whole group or use colored markers for each student. (For individual accountability, have each student record their own responses on a separate sheet.) Rotations should be timed (ex: 3-5 minutes). Before responding, groups must read and discuss previous responses charted. The teacher monitors, available to clarify or offer hints when needed. When groups return to their original station, they should read through all responses. End with a whole-group discussion about the experience.

Gallery Walk Variations

“I Like, I Wonder, Next Steps”: This strategy is useful for gathering peer feedback. Students record one thing they like about the work displayed, one thing they wonder about it, and one thing the creator could do next or improve. Tri-colored sticky notes work well for codifying each category.

“Gallery Run”: This strategy works at a faster pace because questions posed are lower level, geared to assess comprehension. Teachers are able to increase the quantity of questions posted to expand student practice.

  • PRO Instructions:
      • Elementary: While reading highlight at least 3 pieces of evidence in GREEN that surprises you then Annotate to explain what this makes you wonder about Can you make a connection to your daily life? Then complete the Quiz and submit the Write prompt after completing Gallery Walk.  
      • Secondary: While reading highlight at least 3 pieces of evidence in GREEN that connects to the Declaration of Independence then Annotate to explain your reasoning.Then complete the Quiz and submit the Write prompt after completing Gallery Walk.
  • Write prompt:
    • Elementary: Based on your observations during the Gallery Walk, why is the Declaration of the Rights of Man important to our everyday lives? Use evidence from the text and from your observations during the Gallery Walk to support your claim.
    • Secondary: Based on your observations during the Gallery Walk, how is the Declaration of the Right of Man similar or different from the Declaration of Independence? Use evidence from the text and from your observations during the Gallery Walk to support your claim.

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