Profiling and the Pipeline (9-12)

Overview

This 3-tiered lesson might be an interesting and engaging introduction to any exploration of stereotyping, inequality, civil rights, and/or identity. While the readings focus upon the experience of African Americans, this lesson opens the door for discussion and exploration of the different treatment of individuals based on race, culture, religion, gender, sexuality, etc. 

Grade Range: 9-12
Pinboard: Race Relations in America 
Theme(s)

  • Primary: Human Experience 
  • Other: Power/Powerlessness; Overcoming Obstacles

Curricular Connections

  • ELA
  • Social Studies
  • World Language (Cultural Studies)
  • Sociology

Primary Common Core Connection

  • ELA Reading Informational Text Standards .1-.3, .8
  • ELA Speaking and Listening .1, .2, and .4
  • Reading History Standards .1 and .2  

Tags 

African American, Profiling, Stereotypes, Bias, Racism, Bigotry, Media, Ethics, Cultural Sensitivity, Inequality, Civil Rights, Identity, Empathy, Human Experience

Guiding Question

How do our experiences impact our view of, and place in, the world? 

Goal and Rationale

Citizens must be critical consumers and producers of information. As students engage with the texts and media they are exposed to on a daily basis, they must think critically and detect not only the superficial information, but also implicit purpose and potential biases as well.

Throughout these lessons, students must not only present claims, but also offer clear and relevant supporting evidence in both written and spoken communication. 

This lesson is presented in 3-tiers, however the teacher has the option of implementing any or all of the tiers that work best with his/her goals, students, available time, and class structure.

Materials Needed

Provided by NEWSELA:

External Resources:

  • Getting’ Frisky – Stop & Frisk
  • ACLU - Gone Too Far
  • School to Prison Pipeline 

Lesson Elements

Tier I

  1. As students enter the classroom, the teacher poses the following question – How do our experiences impact our view of, and place in, the world? – Students take approximately 5 minutes to reflect upon this question. They might journal their responses, pair-share with another student to discuss their initial thinking, or chart responses as a class. The teacher might encourage students to consider a specific experience they have had, positive or negative, that has impacted them. Students should be encouraged, but not necessarily required, to share these responses, as they may be of a personal nature.
  2. Students then read Black Teenager says He was Arrested Just for Buying a Belt. Each student reads the article at his/her individual accessibility level and uses the Newsela annotation feature to make notes in the margin.
     Tip: Infuse targeted and probing questions for students directly into the document!  
  3. Following the reading, the teacher facilitates a class wide exploration of the infographic – Getting’ Frisky – Stop & Frisk
    NOTE: This element of the lesson is a collaborative activity so that the infographic is accessible to all levels of readers within your classroom.
  4. The teacher then engages the students in a Socratic Seminar or similarly structured discussion, centering on the prompt below. The students discuss their responses, continually providing text-based and infographic-based evidence and justification for their claims. They build upon the ideas of others, question, and challenge thinking throughout the discussion.
    • How might Trayon Christian’s experience at Barneys have impacted his view of, and place in, the world?
    • Is “stop & frisk” (or racial profiling) acceptable even if it violates civil rights?

Tier II

  1. Students read Black Preschoolers More Likely to get Suspended. Each student reads the article at his/her individual accessibility level and uses the Newsela annotation feature to take notes in the margin.
  2. Following this, the teacher questions students to consider the educational experiences of African Americans and how this might impact their view of, and place in, the world. Students share their thinking through reflective journaling, a pair share, or a brief class discussion.
  3. The teacher then shows the video – ACLU - Gone Too Far and the infographic – School to Prison Pipeline.
    NOTE: This element of the lesson is a collaborative activity so that the infographic is accessible to all levels of readers within your classroom.
  4. Either in small groups of 2-3 or individually, the students consider the impact Kyle Thompson’s experience has had on his life and place in the world. Was Kyle’s punishment just? What is the relationship of Kyle’s experience to the information found in the infographic? Students are given approximately 20 minutes to complete this task.  
  5. Students should be given the opportunity to share their thinking with classmates. This might be accomplished through a modified jigsaw discussion or posting their thoughts to a class blog/website.  

Tier III

  1. As a final task, students are charged with creating a campaign to combat racial profiling and/or the school to prison pipeline by heightening awareness of the problem. Students should consider the power, impact, and implications of their campaign.  Students might create an informational video, infographic, photo essay, etc. to convey their message.

Resources

  • American Civil Liberties Union. "[Infographic] School-to-Prison Pipeline."American Civil Liberties Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Aug. 2014.
  • American Civil Liberties Union Videos. "Gone Too Far: Our Kids in Handcuffs." YouTube. YouTube, 20 Sept. 2013. Web. 12 Aug. 2014.
  • Ray Noland. "Start Creating, Sharing & Exploring Great Visuals Today!"Gettin' Frisky. Cannabis Now Magazine, 19 Aug. 2013. Web. 12 Aug. 2014.
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