Animal Rights - Point of View Teaching Guide

Teaching Guide

Recommended Text Set

Animal Rights

Skills

Primary Skills
Point of View  / Author’s Purpose

Secondary Skills
What the Text Says, and People, Events & Ideas

Reading Behaviors

Nonfiction

  • Cite evidence while summarizing
  • Make inferences about non fiction from text evidence
  • Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic
  • Determine and note the similarities and differences between points of view within a text or across texts
  • Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to make a point
  • Identify reasons and evidence that substantiate claims
  • Analyze how an author distinguishes his or her point of view
  • Make comparisons between two or more authors’ points of view on the same topic

Newsela Articles

This section is organized by nonfiction skills necessary for students to become strong readers. These articles can help you target student understanding for skill. We’ve included at least three articles for each subskill. We suggest that you use one for guided instruction, one for independent practice, and one for re-teaching.

Identify Point of View / Author’s Purpose Determine reasons and evidence that support point of view Analyze the validity of the point of view / author’s purpose Make comparisons between different points of view on the same topic

Humane treatment not just for humans: Website tries to save animals

U.S. government is planning to farm fish in the Pacific Ocean

We must save the Amazon's water before it's too late, scientists say

Western states try to control wolf attacks on livestock

Bullfighting is legal again in an area of Spain

Africa’s lions are disappearing, but hunters say "don't blame us"

Opinion: Kenya burns ivory, sends world a strong message

Are sea pens or SeaWorld tanks better for captive killer whales?

Veterinarians may be prevented from declawing cats in New Jersey

Issue Overview: Animal testing

Issue Overview: Should people become vegetarians?

PRO/CON: Will eating fewer hamburgers help save the planet?

 

Formative Tasks

The tasks provide teachers with relevant resources for classroom implementation. Teachers can use these activities and assessments to determine student learning.


PRO Teacher Resources & Lesson Plans

These resources are available right on the article.  They can be used whole class, small group, and as independent practice.

Debating the future of fish - Debate

Close Reading: Evaluate the Evidence [with scaffolds] - Reading Strategy

Writing for a cause: Ranchers vs. Environmentalists - Persuasive Writing

Should bullfighting remain illegal? - Debate

How can analyzing multiples texts better our understanding of a topic? - Paired Text

Animal ethics case study - Group work

Should declawing be prohibited? - Discussion

PRO / CON: Eat Less Meat to Protect Our Environment - Opinion writing Lesson Plan


PRO Assign

These are the instructions you can use when you assign any of the articles above.

While reading, highlight words that repeat in the article.  Reread those words and phrases to reflect on the author’s purpose.


While reading, highlight reasons in yellow. Highlight evidence (statistics, facts) in red.

While reading, highlight in purple places in the text that share author’s tone


While reading, highlight in green evidence of the author’s bias. Make text to text and text to world connections to analyze the author’s bias

 


Recommended
Annotations

These annotations are available on the article page.  All you have to do is share them with your readers.

Humane treatment not just for humans: Website tries to save animals

Western states try to control wolf attacks on livestock

Veterinarians may be prevented from declawing cats in New Jersey

 


Annotations
for all
Articles

These annotations can be used in any of the articles above. These annotations could be added to any Newsela article that targets Point of View. 

What does the author focus on and continue to repeat?

What did the author think you already knew?

What reasons does the the author use to share his or her point of view?

 
What does the author focus on and continue to repeat?

Why was this person quoted or cited and what did this add?

What can you infer from the evidence the author cites?

What tone does the author use?

How does the tone support the point of view of the author?

What language do the author or authors use that may show bias?

Why was this person quoted or cited and what did this add?


Assessments
& Binder

These can be used as formative assessment throughout.  

For summative assessment insights, go to your Binder and filter by the date range you assigned these articles. Reflect on the progress students have made in the skill.

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback.

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback. 

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback.

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback.

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