Technology & Us - Arguments and Claims Teaching Guide

Teaching Guide

Recommended Text Set
Technology & Us

Skills

Primary Skills
Arguments & Claims

Secondary Skills
Point of View / Author’s Purpose, Central Idea, Word Meaning & Choice

Reading Behaviors

Nonfiction

  • Cite evidence while summarizing
  • Make inferences about nonfiction from text evidence
  • Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic
  • Trace an argument and the claims that support it throughout a text
  • Analyze the text structure used to deliver the argument
  • Analyze how language developed and refines claims
  • Identify false statements and fallacies
  • Identify counterclaims and assess the effectiveness
  • Evaluate an argument and the claims by assessing if the reasoning is sound and the evidence relevant/sufficient
  • Make comparisons between two or more arguments within a text assessing reasoning and evidence

Newsela Articles

This section is organized by nonfiction skills necessary for students to become strong readers. These articles can help you target student understanding for skill. We’ve included at least three articles for each subskill. We suggest that you use one for guided instruction, one for independent practice, and one for re-teaching.

Determining argument by looking closely at claims Identifying reasoning and evidence Assessing reasoning and evidence Determining counterclaims to evaluate argument

Opinion: We love it, hate it, and sometimes fear it - technology

PRO/CON: Is it time to hop into self-driving cars?

PRO/CON: Was it right for Apple to say no to helping FBI hack an iPhone?


PRO/CON: Putting GMO information on our food labels

PRO/CON: Are warning labels needed for e-cigarettes?

PRO/CON: Should online gambling be allowed?

Opinion: Cargo drones are a gadget that can work for those who need it

Opinion: Drones possess unique challenges that must be addressed

Top singers team up with Jay-Z in new music-streaming business

 


Opinion: Gene editing is powerful tool for good but only if used wisely

Opinion: Scientists seek rules to ensure proper use of “gene editing” tools

PRO/CON: Should Snowden get a freedom medal or jail time?

Formative Tasks

The tasks provide teachers with relevant resources for classroom implementation. Teachers can use these activities and assessments to determine student learning.


PRO Teacher Resources & Lesson Plans

These resources are available right on the article.  They can be used whole class, small group, and as independent practice.

Stoplight Reading - A Reading Strategy

Debate lines - A Reading Strategy

Now and Then - Paired Texts

Gambling Stats - A Reading Strategy

Deliberate the claims - Paired texts

Who you know? - A Reading Strategy

Opposing sides - A Reading Strategy  

Questioning the text - A Reading Strategy


PRO Assign

These are the instructions you can use when you assign any of the articles above.

Highlight in GREEN one sentence from the PRO section and CON section that shows the author's argument and supports the claims.

While reading, notice the author’s set of reasons and evidence. Highlight the reasons in PURPLE and the evidence in GREEN.

Annotate to share why you think the author used that particular set of reasons and evidence.

Authors use reasons and evidence to support their argument.  While reading, question the reasons and evidence provided.  Write at least three annotations in areas of the text that you questioned.

Authors make their argument more valid by citing a counterclaim.  Highlight the counterclaim in YELLOW. Annotate why or why not you think the counterclaim was effective.


Annotations
for all
Articles

These annotations can be used in any of the articles above. These annotations could be added to any Newsela article that targets Arguments & Claims. 

What claim is the author making?

What language does the author use to articulate the claim?

What did the author think you already knew?

 What is the difference between reasons and evidence?

What does the author focus on and continue to repeat?

Why was this person quoted or cited and what did this add?

Why did the author use these numbers or amounts?

Why did the author use this language?

How persuasive are the reasons used?

What makes this evidence sound?

Why did the author use these numbers or amounts?  

Why was this person quoted or cited and what did this add?

Why are false facts or fallacies cited here?

Why did the author use this language?

How did the author argue against the counterclaim?

What makes the argument valid?


Assessments
& Binder

These can be used as formative assessment throughout.  

For summative assessment insights, go to your Binder and filter by the date range you assigned these articles. Reflect on the progress students have made in the skill.

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback.

 

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback. 

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback.

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback.

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