Power to the Students - Central Idea Teaching Guide

Teaching Guide

Recommended Text Set
Power To The Students

Skills

Primary Skills
Central Idea

Secondary Skills
What the Text Says, People, Events and Ideas, & Word Meaning and Choice

Reading Behaviors

Nonfiction

  • Cite evidence while summarizing and drawing inferences
  • Make inferences about nonfiction from text evidence
  • Determine two or more central ideas from the text
  • Explain how key details support the central idea
  • Explain the connections/relationships between important figures, ideas, and concepts

Newsela Articles

This section is organized by nonfiction skills necessary for students to become strong readers. These articles can help you target student understanding for skill. We’ve included at least three articles for each subskill. We suggest that you use one for guided instruction, one for independent practice, and one for re-teaching.

Make Predictions Identify Central Idea Identify Key Details Summarize
 
Army of volunteers helps restore Civil War cemetery

Museum program uses art to help students remember Holocaust lessons

It's app-ropos: Ancient Native American trail receives recognition


Georgetown pupil helps bridge the gap between workers and students

College football player's lunch date with a boy with autism

For young engineering student, it's about making a difference for people

University of Missouri president resigns amid campus racial tensions

Missouri football players find their voice, and a president resigns

Missouri campus protest sparks new passion among college students

 

Standing Rock tribe receives $1 million for pipeline protest

No, your Facebook friends did not take a vacation en masse to the Dakotas

Women Leaders: Malala Yousafzai

Formative Tasks

The tasks provide teachers with relevant resources for classroom implementation. Teachers can use these activities and assessments to determine student learning.


PRO Teacher Resources & Lesson Plans

These resources are available right on the article.  They can be used whole class, small group, and as independent practice.

Apps in Society - Paired Texts

Close Reading: Notice and Note

Research: Project Based Learning

How can we compare multiple texts? - Paired Texts

Synthesizing information - A Reading Strategy

Comparing perspectives - Paired Text

How does social media shape our world? - Jigsaw


PRO Assign

These are the instructions you can use when you assign any of the articles above.

Before reading the article, use the picture and the headline to predict what the article will be about. Indicate this prediction by highlighting first sentence of the article and writing it in the margin.


While reading the article, write a central idea for each section. Highlight two key details in yellow that support the central idea you have defined.

While reading, use the highlighting feature to mark big ideas in green and specific details in red.

While reading, highlight the 5 W’s of the article in yellow. Then annotate in the margin how each one helps you determine the central idea.


As you read, highlight the sentences that best show the main idea. Then, write an annotation restating the main idea in your own words.

 


Recommended
Annotations

These annotations are available on the article page.  All you have to do is share them with your readers.


Museum program uses art to help students remember Holocaust lessons

Georgetown pupil helps bridge the gap between workers and students

Surveillance technology raises concerns about privacy violations

 
Standing Rock tribe receives $1 million for pipeline protest

No, your Facebook friends did not take a vacation en masse to the Dakotas


Annotations
for all
Articles

These annotations can be used in any of the articles above. These annotations could be added to any Newsela article that targets Central Idea.

Looking at the headline and image, what do you predict the article will be about?

After reading x paragraph, what do you infer will happen next?

 
What is the central idea of this text?

Who are the people involved?

What event is taking place?

What words help you understand the central idea?

What key details support the central idea?

How does the author organize the details?

How did you find the key details?

What details do not support the central idea?

What inferences can you make from….

How would you summarize the article?

What language would you use to summarize the central idea and key details of the text?

How would you explain the similarities and differences between the central ideas of two articles?


Assessments
& Binder

These can be used as formative assessment throughout.  

For summative assessment insights, go to your Binder and filter by the date range you assigned these articles. Reflect on the progress students have made in the skill.

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback.

Extension
What connections do you see between all three articles?

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback. 

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback.

Quiz
Students should take quizzes for all articles.

Write
Have students respond to at least one write prompt from the articles listed above.

Annotations
Respond to at least one annotation for each student. Be sure to give specific feedback.

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