Women's History Reading Club (Students can join now!)

What is the Women's History Club?

Student Reading Clubs are Newsela classes hosted by Newsela Educator Specialists. This reading club will encourage students to explore various aspects of women's history while practicing close reading skills.

As soon as students join, they will be assigned the nine articles in the Women’s History Club Text Set. Each article has instructions to take the quiz and practice a close reading strategy through annotating. To encourage students to think deeply and creatively about women's history, an annotation at the end of each article will ask students to write creatively about the topic (for example, in the form of a letter, journal entry, or poem). As a PRO educator, you can view student progress and read student annotations for the clubs in your binder (more details on viewing progress here).

How can students join?

If your students already have Newsela accounts, have them sign in and join using the Class Code or Class Link. More detailed instructions here.

If your students don't have Newsela accounts, just have them go to Newsela, click Sign up, select Yes when asked Are you joining a teacher's class? and then enter the Class Code.

How do the club assignments work?

As soon as your students join the club, they will see all nine articles in the Women’s History Club Text Set as assignments in their binder. They can complete the articles in any order, over any period of time. We suggest asking students to complete all articles within three weeks.

Most quizzes for these articles cover Reading Skill 2 (Central Idea). Many of them cover Reading Skill 3 (People, Events, and Ideas). 

Each article will be accompanied by annotation instructions with one of these strategies:

  • Highlight unknown words in GREEN. Using clues from the article, draw pictures that represent what you think each word means. Then, in an annotation next to each word, make a guess about what the word means.
  • Highlight the title of one section. In an annotation, describe the main idea of that section. How does this connect to the main idea of the whole article? If you took this section out, how would the article change?    
  • As you read the article, highlight and annotate: When you learn new information, highlight in GREEN. Why did the author include this information? When you have an idea or opinion about something, highlight in YELLOW. What is your idea or opinion? When you are confused, highlight in RED. What is confusing?

An annotation at the end of each article will ask students to write creatively about the topic (for example, in the form of a letter, journal entry, or poem).

Have questions or feedback? Please let us know at community@newsela.com. We'd love to hear your ideas for how these clubs can best support the learning of your students!

 
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