For students who are new to Newsela: Current Reading Clubs

Student Reading Clubs are Newsela classes hosted by Newsela Educator Specialists. By following the Class/Club Link, any student can join these clubs, and will immediately receive the club assignments. More detailed instructions on how students join classes here. With annotation instructions, we’ll help students make meaningful connections as they read. As a Newsela PRO educator, you'll be able to track your students' progress in your Binder.  

Students can join the clubs at any time. We recommend asking students to complete all 9 assignments in 3 weeks, but some teachers might find that a different time frame works better for their classes. 

Current Reading Clubs

Women’s History Club

Give students this Club Link: newsela.com/join/#/3U9ABE

Students will be guided to sign up and immediately assigned these 9 articles about women’s history. Each article has instructions to take the quiz and practice a close reading strategy through annotating. To encourage students to think deeply and creatively about women's history, an annotation at the end of each article will ask students to write creatively about the topic (for example, in the form of a letter, journal entry, or poem). 

Most quizzes for these articles cover Reading Skill 2 (Central Idea). Many of them cover Reading Skill 3 (People, Events, and Ideas). 

Each article will be accompanied by annotation instructions with one of these strategies:

  • Highlight unknown words in GREEN. Using clues from the article, draw pictures that represent what you think each word means. Then, in an annotation next to each word, make a guess about what the word means.
  • Highlight the title of one section. In an annotation, describe the main idea of that section. How does this connect to the main idea of the whole article? If you took this section out, how would the article change?    
  • As you read the article, highlight and annotate: When you learn new information, highlight in GREEN. Why did the author include this information? When you have an idea or opinion about something, highlight in YELLOW. What is your idea or opinion? When you are confused, highlight in RED. What is confusing?

Evidence Detectives Club

Give students this Club Link: newsela.com/join/#/FW69YU  

Students will be guided to sign up and immediately assigned these 9 articles about high-interest topics. Each article has instructions to take the quiz and practice a close reading strategy through annotating. To keep students engaged and practicing their evidence detective skills, there will be a fun brain teaser related to the article at the end of each assignment.

All of these articles have quizzes that cover Reading Skill 1 (What the Text Says) and Reading Skill 7 (Multimedia).

Each article will be accompanied by annotation instructions with one of these strategies:

  • Highlight BIG ideas in GREEN and SPECIFIC details in RED. (Big ideas are themes or central ideas the author is trying to convey. Specific details are examples or facts that support the big idea.) Add annotations to the details explaining what they show about the big ideas.
  • Highlight three important details in the article in RED, and add  annotations with numbers next to them: #1 for most important, #3 for least important. In an annotation next to detail #2, answer these questions: What idea does the detail prove or show? Why is it more important than #3? Why is it less important than #1?
  • Pretend that you need to explain the article to a student who is much younger than you. In an annotation at the end of the article, write your explanation of the main idea. Why is this idea important? Describe one detail that illustrates the main idea.

Why have your students join a Reading Club?

Student Reading Clubs can help your students learn by:

  • Keeping students reading during busy times of the year and school breaks
  • Giving some or all of your students a way to do extra work on strengthening their reading skills
  • Encouraging students to explore and think deeply about a certain topic

How can teachers track student progress in Reading Clubs?

As long as your students are in one of your classes, you can track their progress by following these steps. If you need to have students join your classes first, you can do that on your classes page--just give students the Class Code or Class Link for one of your classes. 

Do you have questions or feedback about the Student Reading Clubs? Please let us know at community@newsela.com. We'd love to hear your ideas for how these clubs can best support the learning of your students!

Powered by Zendesk